Pumpkin-Pie socks

pumpkin

To celebrate the return of knitting weather I’ve put together a pattern for Village Wool Shop customers. It’s a simple lace – the repeats are designed to split evenly within three double pointed needles or the two ends of a long circular if you prefer – without wandering over into the next needle. It’s also simple to split for the heel working for the same reason. Every other row is knit and the pattern gets plenty of texture from a simple purl row too. The heel is my usual slipped stitch pattern and there is full instructions for turning the heel and grafting the toe.

vw-lace-5

I think they look gorgeous in this pumpkin-shade of yellowy orange (called Turmeric by manufacturer West Yorkshire Spinners… but hey, different strokes for different folks) but I reckon they’d be a treat in a vivid red. Just in time for Christmas? You’ll need 100g of your chosen sock yarn – preferably a plain colour, and 2.5 or 2.75mm sock needles. Happy knitting!

Here’s the pattern!

Abbreviations

k – knit

p – purl

k2tog – knit the next two stitches together

yo – yarn over the needle to make a loop

sl1 k1 psso – slip the next stitch, knit one, and then pass the slipped stitch over the knit stitch.

Cuff and leg

Cast on 60 stitches and join to knit in the round – being careful not to twist your stitches.

Knit one round

Rib pattern – *knit one thru back of the loop (tbl), purl one, to end of the round*

Repeat * to * for 18 rounds or until desired length (n.b. –  if you decide to make the rib longer or shorter make a note of how many rounds you knitted`)

Lace pattern – over 8 rounds

Commence lace pattern.

Note – every even row =  knit all stitches.

1.  *p1, k1, yo, (s1, k1, psso), k3, k2 tog, yo, k1*  repeat from * to * to end of round.

3. * p1, k2, yo, (s1, k1, psso), k1, k2 tog, yo, k2* repeat from * to * to end of round

5.  *p1,  k3, yo (s1, k2 tog, psso), yo, k3  repeat from * to * to end of round

7.   purl all stitches

Work all eight rounds of the lace pattern 5 times, then work rows 1 to 7.

To start the heel

Organise stitches for heel  (worked on row 8 of the lace pattern – i.e. knit all stitches)

Knit 20 stitches from your first needle and then knit the next 11 stitches onto the same needle. (31 sts in total = Instep stitches) and then place these 31 instep stitches onto two needles/stitch holder. You will knit the heel onto the remaining 29 stitches.

Purl across the remaining 29 stitches and increase 1 stitch at the end – 30 sts. ( And you’ll have two rows of purl stitches)

Knit heel flap.

Next row (wrong side facing – slip 1, purl to end.

**First pattern row: Slip first stitch as if to purl, *k1 , slip one purl wise* to last stitch, k 1

Next row: Slip first stitch as if to purl, purl to end**

(Hint: the slipped stitches look a little different from the normal purl stitches, just purl them as normal, but you may need to pay a little bit more attention when knitting them to avoid picking up stray loops!)

Repeat from ** to ** 14 times.

 

Heel

Shape the heel turn –

With right side facing,

Row 1. Sl 1, k16, sl 1, k1  psso, k1, turn work around.

2. Sl 1, p 5, p 2 tog, p1, turn work.

3. Sl 1, k 6, sl 1k1 psso, k1 turn work,

4. Sl 1, p 7, p 2 tog, purl 1 turn work.

5. Sl 1, k 8,  sl1 k1 psso k1, turn work.

6. Sl 1, p9 p2 tog, p1, turn work

7. Sl 1 k10 sl1 k1 psso, k1, turn work

8. Sl 1 p 11, p2 tog, p1, turn work

9. Sl 1, k12,  sl 1k1 psso, k, turn work

10. Sl 1, p13, p2 tog, p1, turn work.

11. Sl 1, k 14, sl 1 k1 psso k 1, turn

Last row Sl 1, p15, p 2 tog, p1

You’ve made the heel turn and now have 18 stitches on your needle with the right side facing you.

Next row – Sl1, knit to end.

Then use one of your spare needles to pick up and knit 15 stitches from the side of the heel flap using the slipped stitches,

Pick up and knit an additional stitch from the beginning of the double purl bumps at the start of the heel flap.

(16 stitches now on this needle)

Instep stitches – recommencing lace pattern with row 1, *p1, k1, yo, (sl1, k1, psso), k3, k2tog, yo, k1* repeat three times until one stitch remains, p1. (this gives you 3 lace panels with a purl stitch either end).

FROM THIS POINT – THE PATTERN FOR NEEDLE 2 ALWAYS BEGINS AND ENDS WITH A PURL STITCH.

Pick up & knit one stitch from the double purl bumps at the start of the heel flap, & then 15 stitches from the second side of the heel flap using the slipped stitches (as above).

Then using the same needle, knit across 9 stitches from the first needle. Move the remaining stitches onto the next needle, slipping them purl wise

You have now got stitches on 3 needles again: the first needle has 25 stitches, the second has 31 (instep stitches), the third has 25.

Place a marker for the start of the rounds.

Heel Gusset

Next round -** Needle 1- knit to last 3 stitches on the needle, k2 tog, k 1,

Needle 2, keep lace pattern correct as set, Needle 3, k1, sl1 k1 psso, knit to end.

Next round,  Needle 1- knit all sts, Needle 2, the next row of the lace pattern, Needle 3 k all sts.**

From ** to** sets gusset decrease pattern and lace pattern on the instep sts. Repeat until you have 15 sts on needles 1 & 3 and 31 on needle 2.

Next rounds.

Knit all stitches on needles 1 & 3, follow lace pattern on needle 2. Repeat, keeping pattern correct until the foot is the desired length – ideally on the last row of the lace pattern – but see note below. End your round on needle 3.

Shape toe.

Next round. (needle 1), k until last 3 stitches, k2 tog, k1, (needle 2), k1, (s1,k2tog, psso) , k to last 3 stitches k2tog, k1, (needle 3) k1, (s1,k1, psso) k to end.  needle 1 =14 sts, needle 2 =28 sts, needle 3 = 14 sts.

**Next round – knit all sts

Next round k until last 3 stitches, k2 tog, k1, (needle 2), k1, (s1,k1, psso) , k to last 3 stitches k2tog, k1, (needle 3) k1, (s1,k1, psso) k to end.**  ** to ** sets toe decreases. Repeat from ** to ** until there are 5sts on needle 1, 11 on needle 2 and 5 on needle 3. Knit one extra round, decreasing one stitch on needle 2 only.

(If your desired foot measurement means that you won’t be able to complete a lace pattern block – you can do one of three things – if you are happy to start the toe mid-lace block that’s fine, or you can modify the toe decreases to give yourself a longer/shorter toe instead. Decrease every THIRD row twice to produce a longer toe, or decrease EVERY row after 4 sets of decreases to produce a shorter toe)

Re-arrange your stitches as follows, place the two lots of five onto single needle. You have two lots of 10 sts on 2 needles.

Graft toes together as follows.

Set up

Arrange your stitches: put sts from needles 1 & 3 on the same needle.

Cut your yarn leaving a manageable length for sewing. Thread it on an appropriate darning needle.

Then insert the darning needle into the st facing you as if the darning needle was going to purl it, pull the yarn through.

Then insert the darning needle into the rear stitch as if the needle was going to knit it, pull the yarn through.

1. Then insert your darning needle into the front st as if you were going to knit it, pull the yarn through and slip the st off the needle, then insert the needle into the next st, as if to purl, pull the yarn thru BUT DON’T slip the st off.

2. Then insert your darning needle into the back st as if you were going to purl it, pull the yarn through and slip the st off the needle, then insert the needle into the next st, as if to knit, pull the yarn thru BUT DON’T slip the st off.

Repeat steps 1 and 2 until all stitches have been worked, darn in the ends.

 

 

Sock it to me…

If you love hand knitted socks but hate the pointy little needles and the lengthy time investment – try your hand at double knitting or aran versions.

Quicker to knit and using thicker needles, they’re slightly less intimidating and if you crack on, they might even be ready as Christmas gifts. Double knitting socks are ideal as hiking boot socks made in a good wool/ wool mix, or bed socks in a squashier blend if you know someone with chilly toes. Aran makes an excellent welly sock (worn over a thin pair of cotton socks for comfort). Again wool or wool mix is ideal, but any aran will do.

Once you’ve made a pair or two, and you’re comfortable with the techniques, you could even size up to chunky for a great slipper sock!

Please note that the following instructions have been put together fairly quickly – let me know if there are any glaring mistakes – by email at villagewoolly AT gmail DOT com or phone 01706 222116

 

Instructions

You’ll need about 100/150g of DK or Aran yarn and and four double pointed needles size 3.5mm or 4mm for aran.

Before you start, measure your foot from the heel bone to the toe bone and note the length.

Cast on 44/48/52 stitches and join to knit in the round, making sure your stitches aren’t twisted.

44 is about right for small DK or ladies aran. 48 sts is about right for average women’s DK and 52 is about right for men’s aran. But please note that I haven’t tested every single sock on every single foot – you’ll have to use your judgement!

Follow the appropriate instructions for your cast on stitch count. It might be a good idea to print off the instructions and then highlight your stitch count.

Knit 3 inches (or desired length) in k2, p2 rib.

If you want longer boot socks, start your rib on 4mm (5mm for aran) needles and half way through your rib swap to the smaller needles – this will give you a fold over piece of ribbing.

Change to stocking stitch (k every row) and knit the leg of your socks – again if you want knee/welly socks it’s best to use 4mm (5mm for aran) needles for the calf/cuff and then swap to the smaller needles when you get to within 2 inches of the ankle.

Heel

Divide your stitches – you’ll be knitting your heel on half of your stitches – 22/24/26 – so organise your stitches such that you have 22/24/26 stitches on your first needle and 11/12/13 on each of the other 2.

You’ll work backwards and forwards on the first needle.

Heel flap pattern

Row 1. slip 1 purl wise, knit one to end/

2. purl to end (be careful, the slipped stitches are a bit more fiddly to work)

Repeat rows 1 & 2 , 11/12/13 time – 22/24/26 rows in total.

Now work the heel turn for your cast-on stitch count.

Heel for 44 sts

With right side facing

1, sl1, k11, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

2. sl1, p3, , p2tog, p1, turn work

3. sl1, k4, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

4 sl 1, p5, p2 tog, p1, turn work

5. sl1, k6, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

6  sl 1, p7, p2 tog, p1, turn work

7. sl1, k8, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work

8. sl 1, p9, p2 tog, p1, turn work

9. sl1, k10, k2 tog, turn work

10.sl1, p10,p2tog.

12 stitches remain.

Heel for 48 stitches

1, sl1, k13, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

2. sl1, p3, , p2tog, p1, turn work

3. sl1, k4, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

4 sl 1, p5, p2 tog, p1, turn work

5. sl1, k6, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

6  sl 1, p7, p2 tog, p1, turn work

7. sl1, k8, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work

8. sl 1, p9, p2 tog, p1, turn work

9. sl1, k10, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work

10. sl 1, p11, p2 tog, p1, turn work.

14 sts remain

Heel for 52 sts

1, sl1, k13, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

2. sl1, p3, , p2tog, p1, turn work

3. sl1, k4, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

4 sl 1, p5, p2 tog, p1, turn work

5. sl1, k6, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work.

6  sl 1, p7, p2 tog, p1, turn work

7. sl1, k8, (sl1, k1, psso), k1, turn work

8. sl 1, p9, p2 tog, p1, turn work

9. sl1, k10, k2 tog, turn work

10.sl1, p10, p2tog, p1, turn work.

11. sl1. k12, k2tog, turn work

12 sl1, p12, p2tog.

14 sts remain.

Heel turn is complete – you have 12/14/14 sts remaining on your needle with the right side facing.

Knit across

With a spare needle, pick up and knit 11/12/13 sts down the side of the heel turn using the slipped stitches at the beginning of the heel flap as a guide.

Then using another needle k11/12/13 stitches from each of the next two needles onto the same needle (22/2426 in total), then using another needle, k11/12/13 sts from the second side of the sock, THEN on the same needle knit 6/7/7 stitches from your heel needle – move the remaining six/seven/seven onto the first heel flap needle.

You will now have needles with stitches as follows: first needle (1) 17/19/20 stitches, second needle (2) 22/24/26 sts, third needle 17/19/20 sts.

Complete heel gusset as follows.

Round 1. Needle 1 – knit to 3 sts from end of needle, k2 tog, k1,  Needle 2, k to end, Needle 3, k1 (sl1, k1, psso), knit to end.

Round 2. k all sts.

These two rows complete your decrease pattern. Repeat until you have 11/12/13 stitches on needles 1 and 3 and 22/24/26 on the needle 2.

Heel complete.

Now continue in stocking stitch (k ever round) until your foot is the desired length (as measured at the beginning)

To decrease for the toe.

Next round (applies to all sizes)

1. Needle 1, k to 3 sts from end, k2tog, k1, needle 2, k1, (sl1, k1, psso), k to 3 sts from end k2 tog, k1, needle 3, k1, (sl1, k1, psso).

2. k all sts.

Rounds 1 & 2 set decreases for toe, continue until you have 4 sts on needle 1 & 3 and 8 on needle 2.

Graft toe stitches together (using Kitchener stitch)

Set up

Arrange your stitches: put sts from needles 1 & 3 on the same needle.

Cut your yarn leaving a manageable length for sewing. Thread it on an appropriate darning needle.

Then insert the darning needle into the st facing you as if the darning needle was going to purl it, pull the yarn through.

Then insert the darning needle into the rear stitch as if the needle was going to knit it, pull the yarn through.

1. Then insert your darning needle into the front st as if you were going to knit it, pull the yarn through and slip the st off the needle, then insert the needle into the next st, as if to purl, pull the yarn thru BUT DON’T slip the st off.

2. Then insert your darning needle into the back st as if you were going to purl it, pull the yarn through and slip the st off the needle, then insert the needle into the next st, as if to knit, pull the yarn thru BUT DON’T slip the st off.

Repeat steps 1 and 2 until all stitches have been worked, darn in the ends.

Done! Now make a second one to match. And enjoy!

The joy of knitting…

On the drive to the shop today, Woman’s Hour on Radio 4 featured this song (banned from the BBC as being a bit racy at the time….)

It’s illegal, immoral or it makes you fat. How true. But do you know one thing that doesn’t fall into those categories – knitting, that’s what.

The impact on your  bank balance? Well that’s another story….

Chr..afting

 

img_2311If you’ve been in a large shop since the weekend you might have noticed a certain, um, seasonal sparkliness and proclamations of impending festivities – in a few short months Christmas will be upon us.

Some of you will already be organised. A few people I know go shopping for cards and paper in the January sales, keep a spreadsheet for presents and started buying mid-May. These people are to be applauded of course, but also possibly avoided. No-one likes a smug-bucket after all.

The rest of us will try and ignore the signs for a few more weeks, and then plunge into the shopping mayhem with shoulders braced. Our poor old pockets will be emptied in short order and that credit card? Sliced in January along with the left over ham.

So let’s assume that we cannot ignore Christmas and that spending a ton of money will leave us with buyers-regret come January, what is the alternative? Crafting that’s what! (or winning a shed-load of money on a lottery ticket, but this is a knitting/crochet blog so…)

Suggestions for crocheted and knitted gifts

  • Use up some of that stashed cotton yarn to make wash/face-cloths – it was intended for that chic summer top but realistically we never really had a summer this year and the chances of a mediterranean-style summer next year are slim. A search online will give you plenty of free patterns (try here and here). Parcel them up with nice soap and you have a lovely gift.
  • Hats, scarfs and mittens – chunky yarns make these a work of moments – a free pattern for a hat is available in the shop. Unlike chic summer tops, we can guarantee that the UK will supply hat and mitten friendly weather.
  • Kindle/iPad/phone sleeves – travellers will appreciate something to keep their precious electronic hardware from bumps and scrapes. You can use up odds and ends of yarn… everyone’s a winner. Lots of online pattern again – like here.
  • Socks – champion knitter? 4 ply socks: a ball of yarn costs around 7 quid and you get a pair of pure wool socks to keep your loved one toes nice and snug. Skills but no time? Consider DK or aran socks – they knit in a trice. Beginner? Simple slipper patterns made up in chunky yarn – like this.
  • Shopping bags – as we are now in a post-plastic-bag era, consider making one of these market bags – if you have more of that summer-top yarn – perfect!
  • Teddys, amigurumi animals – never underestimate a the appeal of cute toys for even very jaded adults!
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shop bought tree decoration –  you could make your own!